Feyland is a full-D (which means you are fully immersed) game-the most high-tech of its kind-and Jennet Carter is the first to play the prototype. But what she doesn’t know is that the Dark Queen of the faeries has decided to use the virtual world as a portal to the real one, and that she’ll be battling for her REAL life.
Tam Linn’s real life is so bad that he finds solace in the simulated life of gamers.  He has no plan to get involved with a rich girl like Jennet.  But he may just be the hero she desperately needs.
Jennet and Tam enter the Dark Realm of Feyland and discover that much more is at stake–like the future of the entire human world.  Can they, with their limited abilities, defeat the dark queen and save mankind?

Sissy:  This book is far out of my wheelhouse (I heard Blake Shelton and then Usher and then Shakira use that term on The Voice) so Bubby was surprised when I loaned her Feyland by Anthea Sharp.  I think Bubby asked me 5 times if I really liked it for sure, because it was so much more her than me.  I told her that I reserve the right to broaden my horizons and be startlingly eclectic at any given moment.  I wondered about it meself when I started reading it, but I actually was able to follow all the futuristic techie jargon without going into a menopausal brain peat bog.

Bubby: At least you THINK you were able to follow it all. As I do not have access into said menopausal brain, I wouldn’t know for sure! But what you say is true. I started reading Feyland and was amazed that you had enjoyed it. But I really shouldn’t be too surprised. After all, the gaming and futuristic stuff is the only aspect that isn’t you – and that’s only part of the book. The bigger part is Fairyland itself – and you are all about the fairies and magic and stuff.

Sissy: I am a fairy. A sparkling flower fairy. Therefore, yes, all that stuff was appealing. This book is futuristic, though, because the rich people have such things as grav-cars (like a hover car sort of dealie), wrist chips, and fully automated houses (named HANA for House Activated Network Assistant). Sort of big-brotherish if you ask me.

Bubby: I like it. I want a grav-car and an automated house. Like the one in the tv show Eureka. Except you never watched that show so you don’t know what I’m talking about but it was cool. It was named SARAH (for words I can’t remember what they stand for). But the future bits aren’t my favorite. My favorite was right at the beginning when we met one of our main characters, Tam Lin and then when the character of Thomas Rimer was introduced. Now if you are a big fan of faerie-realm stories, you will already recognize these names. Tamlin is a famous character from the old Scottish Ballads – a mortal man who was captured by the fairies (Fae, Faery Folk, etc.) and then rescued by his own true love. Thomas Rhymer is also a ballad character – a bard who was so talented that the Fairy Queen decided to keep him as her own personal songsmith. The instant I saw Anthea Sharp use these names for her characters, I knew I had found a kindred soul. I was hooked.

Sissy: Yes, Bubby, you are a nerd. But since I am actually half-human and half-fae, I can’t really blame you for your fixation on the world of fairy.

Bubby: Which half? Somehow I’m not seeing either of our parents as faerykind . . .

Sissy: Just go with it! Stop trying to ruin my alternate realities. The clever thing about Anthea Sharp is that she was able to retell a very old story in a very modern way without any bumps or hitches. It works beautifully. The story flows so well, even for those with no knowledge of fairy lore. I think the author has written something that will capture a whole new demographic.

Bubby: I loves it. Loves loves loves it. I have a weakness for modern-day retellings of old stories; they just do something for me. I love tales that are seasoned with a little (or in this case, a lot) of magic. I even love stories that use age-old archetypes, in this case the poor little rich girl and the poverty stricken boy with a heart of gold. As Sissy said, the tricky part is weaving all of these elements together and actually having it work. This one works. It has it all, even a little hint of romance.

Sissy: The budding romance between Tam Lin and Jennet is reason enough for me to want to continue this series. I can tell they will have a lot more exciting and bonding adventures ahead. Tam Lin’s life is so painfully tragic, I hope better things are in store there, too.

Bubby: I agree! Jennet lives in this great big huge house with just her and her dad, who is never there anyway and Tam and his mom and brother (both of whom have some big medical issues) live in a shack in the super scary part of town. Can’t the Lin family just move into Jennet’s basement or something?

Sissy: Obviously, there is a lot more to explore in the lives of Tam and Jennet and the world of the Fae. I highly recommend Feyland to the techies, the fairytale lovers, and the fantasy fans, because this is a category bending read.  4.25 hover-bubbles.

Bubby:  Feyland checks all the requisite boxes for me.  I can’t wait to continue the series.  Maybe I can get cheapskate Sissy to buy them this time (she says “Not fairy likely…”).  4.5 bubbles.

Click HERE to buy Feyland at Amazon.com